emartin74

If you’re a writer, you probably use Copyscape, or another plagiarism checker, to check your articles for duplicate content. But did you know that if you know your article’s only similar to one article on the Web, you can save money on plagiarism checks by using Copyscape’s free Comparison Tool? I’ll explain how in this short post.

  1. Go to Copyscape’s website.

When you get there you’ll see the options at the top. Hover on the “Products” menu and choose “Free Comparison Tool”

  1. Enter a URL or paste text for item 1, and do the same for item 2

  1. Click “Compare Items”

The next screen that comes back will show you how much of your text is similar to the text on the web page you put in the second box. Here’s an example of what you might see:

The words that are the same on both the website and your document are highlighted in blue. You can then use this information to make changes so your copy passes Copyscape or any of the other more finicky plagiarism checkers out there.

If you know your content is only going to match content from one site on the Internet, this is a great way to save money on Copyscape checks. Be careful though; you can only use it a few times every day – after that, you have to use the paid Copyscape search or a different plagiarism checking tool.

After starting with the right crochet hook, then accidentally going down half a millimeter, I finally finished another crochet project! It’s a market bag – I like how it turned out so much, I might make myself another one later. At Kevin’s suggestion, I’m going to use it for my dirty clothes when we go away on trips.

If you’re wondering how I made it, I made it with a pattern I found on Lion Yarn’s website. I used Lion 24/7 cotton yarn in Mint. You can find the pattern here and the yarn here. The pattern calls for Lion Brand Recycled cotton yarn but it’s been discontinued, so I just used the 24/7 Cotton Yarn.

Picture it: Erie, Pennsylvania, 1974. It’s April 30, and a young mother-to-be wakes up in the middle of the night and finds her nightgown wet. Her heart races – what could be going on? She calls her doctor.

“Doctor, I think my water broke!”

“Are you experiencing any pain?”

“No, no pain at all, isn’t that unusual?”

“Yes, it is. Calm down, and get to the hospital immediately.”

Pat and her husband, Carl, get into their car and drive to the St. Vincent Hospital ER. Pat got into a wheelchair when they arrived while Carl checked her in. When he came back to the examining room, the nurse had hooked her up to the ultrasound machine. Her doctor can see that there’s something wrong.

“We will have to induce your labor, and we may have to pull her out with forceps.”

The doctor gives Pat to induce her contractions, and a few hours later, he pulls out a 7-pound baby girl with forceps. Pat and Carl are relieved to have the ordeal over, but they’re concerned that their baby girl was born three weeks premature.

“Couldn’t that cause problems?” Pat asks the doctor.

“Yes, it could potentially,” he says. “We’ll have to keep Erica here for at least a few days to see if there are any health problems.”

That is the slightly exaggerated story about how my life began. I’ll tell you stories similar to that one, about the different battles I fought throughout my life and the victories I experienced when I accomplished different goals.

I’ll provide a few lessons and takeaways at the end of each story. I hope you’ll see a little bit of yourself through my experiences or maybe learn a few things that will help you fight your own battles and experience a few victories.

Picture it: Erie, Pennsylvania, 1974. It’s April 30, and a young mother-to-be wakes up in the middle of the night and finds her nightgown wet. Her heart races – what could be going on? She calls her doctor.

“Doctor, I think my water broke!”

“Are you experiencing any pain?”

“No, no pain at all, isn’t that unusual?”

“Yes, it is. Calm down, and get to the hospital immediately.”

Pat and her husband, Carl, get into their car and drive to the St. Vincent Hospital ER. Pat got into a wheelchair when they arrived while Carl checked her in. When he came back to the examining room, the nurse had hooked her up to the ultrasound machine. Her doctor can see that there’s something wrong.

“We will have to induce your labor, and we may have to pull her out with forceps.”

The doctor gives Pat to induce her contractions, and a few hours later, he pulls out a 7-pound baby girl with forceps. Pat and Carl are relieved to have the ordeal over, but they’re concerned that their baby girl was born three weeks premature.

“Couldn’t that cause problems?” Pat asks the doctor.

“Yes, it could potentially,” he says. “We’ll have to keep Erica here for at least a few days to see if there are any health problems.”

That is the slightly exaggerated story about how my life began. I’ll tell you stories similar to that one, about the different battles I fought throughout my life and the victories I experienced when I accomplished different goals.

I’ll provide a few lessons and takeaways at the end of each story. I hope you’ll see a little bit of yourself through my experiences or maybe learn a few things that will help you fight your own battles and experience a few victories.

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